Application-like spell checking… on the web?!?!?

I don’t think I can understate how cool this feature is:  spell check as you type.


Ever since I first saw this feature in Word I’ve been wanting it in every application I have (including DasBlog, you listening Omar? :)).  Well, now we finally have it in Windows Live Mail beta.  The way it works is pretty slick too, the client-side code on the browser actually starts handing words and groups of words up to the server to be checked for errors.  When errors are detected the misspellings are indicated on the client with familiar red squiggly lines. 



The best way to get a feeling for this is to see it in action.  Since we haven’t released the feature yet you can’t, unfortunately, try it out… but you can have Imran give you a demo. Check out the Video that Imran, Vikram, Brian and Zeek made, it gives a great run down of the design, development and testing of the feature.


For those of you on the beta and wondering when you’ll see this… I’m predicting you’ll see it before the year is up (but I don’t make any guarantees ;)).

Alfred Anderson 1896 – 2005

The oft-romanticized Christmas truce of 1914 has lost its final witness.  Alfred Anderson was thought to be the last living veteran of the famed yule truce when German and British soldiers sang carols, exchanged gifts and, according to some reports, played a game of soccer.


Alfred Anderson was 109 years old.



British and German soldiers fraternize – Christmas 1914


I had no idea who this man was before today, but his association with the legendary truce makes me a bit sad at his passing.


From BBC News:




Prince Charles has paid tribute to Scotland’s oldest man and the country’s longest serving veteran of World War I, who has died at the age of 109.


Alfred Anderson, who served with the 5th Battalion the Black Watch, died in a nursing home in Angus.


Read the full BBC article




For those of you wanting to read a little more of the history of Christmas truces here is an very complete examination with excellent source documentation.  It is an excellent article, if slightly less romantic than the stories which come out at Christmas time.